How Embellishment Affects Stretch
Many of the garments we make here at JL contain Lycra or Spandex, and are best worn snug.  The movement and the expansion/contraction of the body dictates how we design, cut and sew each garment.  Embellishment then, becomes an issue if it reduces the stretch of the fabric in your garment.  Use these guidelines to help you decide which embellishment method is best for your stretchy custom JL garment.

 
Sublimation
We use sublimation to transfer printed images to fabrics without affecting the stretch or the feel of the garment. When sublimation inks are heated to 400°F, they turn into a gas and form a permanent bond to white, 100% polyester fabric. 

         
Best used when a complex design with multiple colors is your priority.

         
Do not use on the main parts of the bottom.

         
Excellent when used in pattern pieces that are design elements.
 

 
Silkscreen
Silkscreen is the application of ink to a surface.  For true colors on a dark fabric, you will need to "flash" it before applying one to two passes of the ink.  This is the process of laying down a layer of white ink, then drying it so that all subsequent colors will be true.  If it is a light-colored fabric, you can get away with two passes of the ink.

         
We use a special additive in our silkscreen inks that imparts a "give" once it is cured.

         
Silkscreen will "give," not stretch.  So be aware that large areas of total ink coverage will reduce the amount of stretch of the garment.

         
Best application for silkscreen on stretch would be

         
If logo is large (up to 8" wide) it should have breaks between elements so that the fabric can stretch in between

         
Logos 3" to 5" are normally fine in any location.

         
Text down Stripe
 

 
Heat Transfer
There are two kinds of Heat Transfer.  Both of them involve using a cad cutter to "die cut" a shape out of an adhesive material, which is then applied to the fabric with high heat and high pressure.

         
Solid Color Heat Transfer is used for one- or two-colored logos, using a set color palette. This palette includes reflective or metallic effects.

         
Digital Heat Transfer allows us to print anything from gradients to Pantone matched colors.

         
Best application for HT on stretch would be

         
If logo is large (up to 8" wide) it should have breaks between elements so that the fabric can stretch in between

         
Logos 3" to 5" are normally fine in any location.

         
Text down Stripe
 

 
Embroidery
Logos are embroidered onto fabric using a non-woven backing to give stability.  There is absolutely no give or stretch in any direction of an embroidered logo, which only becomes a problem if the logo is quite big.

         
Logos up to 4" wide generally do not affect the fit of a stretch garment

         
Text can affect stretch--remember that the entire line of text will be non-stretchable!  We recommend a limit of 5 characters on a collar, and 7 characters down a sleeve to maximize comfort.
 

 
Applique
Large logos or large single letters sewn onto fabric using satin stitch--can reduce embroidery stitch count. Since an applique is generally large, it will take up a lot of stretch on your garment.  Your rep can help you determine if your applique will work on a stretch garment. 

 
Tackle Twill


Wheras applique is made of designs or shapes, tackle twill is a combination of letters, numbers or designs cut from a piece of fabric that are sewn onto a garment with a zigzag or satin stitch. Tackle twill is most commonly seen as words on the backs of garments

Last updated: 17-02-2016
Author: Jladmin

 
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